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Our Hurricane Preparation Guidelines

When the threat of a hurricane presents itself, there are certain general precautions we should take to protect our home and families, such as stocking up on water, non-perishable foods, flashlights, batteries, and boarding up windows.

In addition, there are also precautions you can take to protect your HVAC system to potentially minimize damage and keep you and your family safe.

closeup of wrenches on an HVAC unit

Keeping your HVAC Safe

To keep your HVAC equipment as safe as possible during the storm, it’s recommended that you:

  • Turn off the HVAC unit, both at the thermostat and circuit breaker. This will reduce the chances of a power surge that could potentially compromise the system.
  • Secure your outdoor unit by making sure all bolts are secure and tight. You can also protect your unit from debris by clearing the area.
  • If there are any signs of damage, do not turn on your unit; all inspection and replacement work on equipment should be performed by qualified heating and cooling professionals.

Flooding and storm surges can cause significant damage; a house or basement exposed to standing water can damage your home’s water heater, furnace, boiler, air-conditioning, ventilation, and heat pump system. Go to http://www.ahrinet.org/Homeowners/Improve-Safety/Floods-and-HVACR-Equipment for more information on how to keep your family safe.

5 Tips for Protecting your Plumbing from Hurricane Flooding

1. Clear All Drains – Check your roof gutters and downspouts to make sure they are securely fastened and take a look at drains along curbs as well as any on your property. Make sure they’re clear of debris and ready to handle the runoff from a heavy downpour.

2. Check the Sump Pump – If you have one of these make sure its outside pipes are clear and free of any clogs. You could check this by pouring several gallons of water down its crock. It should automatically turn on and start pumping.
Know Where Your Main Water Valve Is: You don’t want to search for the main water valve in a downpour, so locate it before the storm, and be prepared to shut it off in case contaminated water starts entering your home’s supply. If you do turn off your main water valve, you should open a faucet furthest away from the main line so air can still enter the system.

3. Know Where Your Main Water Valve Is – You don’t want to search for the main water valve in a downpour, so locate it before the storm and be prepared to shut it off in case contaminated water starts entering your home’s supply. If you do turn off your main water valve, you should open a faucet furthest away from the main line so air can still enter the system.

4. Think Of Your Water Heater – During a flood, you may want to consider turning off the gas or electricity that fuels your water heater so it doesn’t continually try to heat your water.

5. Do a Post-Storm Inspection – After the storm, turn your water main back on and turn on the water heater. Run your faucets and showers and make sure your water runs okay. If not, do not hesitate to call a professional to inspect your plumbing.

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